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The new applicant audit at Rewe is said to be Caparros’ pride and joy. Because it wasn’t all that long ago that some Rewe personnel were muddling along with alchemist methods. The infamous “Reiss Profile” was in circulation at the company. The test is based on the theories of US psychologist Steven Reiss. He divides people’s actions into 16 basic motives, drives such as idealism, honor, status and independence, but also physical activity, rest and “eros.” Reiss’ theories are not scientifically valid, but they are just a pretty theory that everyone can relate to in some way. This makes the test popular with personnel managers. For a long time, the Reiss Profile was apparently circulating in the Rewe Group. After filling out the questionnaires, employees and those who wanted to become one were then asked to explain themselves about their dominant motives in life – even questions about libido were discussed, according to reports. “Graphology is a fanciful pseudoscience”. Schütze-Kreilkamp explicitly distances herself from “unscientific diagnostics” and the Reiss tests, which “encroach on employees’ privacy.” At Rewe, the spook may be over – elsewhere, the most outlandish procedures continue to circulate. There is the controversial facial physiognomist (vulgo: skull interpreter) Dirk Schneemann, a trained painter who believes he can read a person’s characteristics from the shape of his head and maintains an office on Düsseldorf’s Königsallee. He is a welcome guest even in the circles of renowned personnel consultants and is regarded as a whimsical genius. The wondrous doctrine of graphology also seems to be endemic, especially among medium-sized companies. Interpreters of the written word claim to be able to read a person’s entire personality from handwriting. Experts such as Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences professor and business psychologist Uwe Peter Kanning say this is utter humbug: “Graphology is a fanciful pseudoscience.”

An abundance of bizarre procedures

Yet somehow it does sound understandable that managerial handwriting must be “stable, regular and strong in print.” For example, Eugen Block, founder of the Block House steak restaurant chain, relies on the help of graphology to select managers. Anyone who is asked to have their facial shape measured or a handwriting sample analyzed before being hired will quickly know whether they should work for this company or simply turn down the job in case of doubt. However, both are just two particularly striking examples from the wealth of bizarre procedures that employers use to look behind the facade of applicants. At the top of the HR experts’ hit list are so-called type tests such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which is based on the teachings of psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung. The test classifies people in a lumbering fashion: subjects are more likely to be “thinkers” or “feelers,” “inward-looking” or “extroverts,” “observers” or “judgers.” “Results too easily falsified” To the layperson, such ratings may seem seductive. But using the MBTI as the sole means of personnel selection is dangerous, complains renowned Hamburg aptitude diagnostician Werner Sarges: “The results are too easily falsifiable.” Do candidates still have to put up with testing? The draft law on employee data protection, which has been going through parliamentary committees for some time, attempts to answer these questions. The reform actually aims to make it more difficult to screen employees who are already on board. Massive searches of account data (Deutsche Bahn), creditworthiness screenings via Creditreform (Kik) or the comprehensive spying on telephone contacts (Deutsche Telekom) are no longer to be permitted. The bill spends less effort on aptitude tests in the application process. It states succinctly that they should be “necessary” and carried out “according to scientifically recognized methods” “if such methods exist. Data protectionists are decidedly too lax. They want to oblige companies “to test exclusively on the basis of a scientific method,” explains Moritz Karg, data protection officer for Schleswig-Holstein. According to the will of the data protection experts, it should also no longer be possible to put candidates through the test mincer in series. Karg: “Data should only be allowed to be collected if it is indispensable for the performance of the job and represents crucial professional requirements.”

Shift from a culture of mistrust to a culture of trust

Currently, serial tests are quite popular. For example, the “Integrity Assessment” from the company of the well-known Stuttgart-based aptitude diagnostician Heinz Schuler. Today, employers are specifically looking for rule-compliant employees, explains Schuler’s business partner Andreas Frintrup, who developed and markets the integrity test with his team. Psychological diagnostics help in the search, he says, because integrity is a “very stable personality trait that can be measured independently of intelligence.” If unintegre applicants were screened out from the outset, companies could change from a “culture of mistrust” to a “culture of trust”. So do away with complicated codes of ethics and expensive monitoring systems? Just let the honest ones on board, and with a little testing? Compliance officers must find this music to their ears. Around 100,000 times a year, Frintrup says, the integrity test is purchased: “Financial service providers and industrial companies in particular are interested.” Fear of “reputational damage Under the impression of annually increasing cases of uncovered white-collar crime, in view of rigid internal codes of conduct, and simply out of fear of “reputational damage,” companies are trying by all means “to minimize the dangers of unethical behavior in advance of hiring,” comments labor lawyer Boris Dzida. The more sensitive the position, the greater the effort. When it comes to board positions, such as chief financial officer or top IT manager, the supreme discipline of manager screening is being used more and more frequently: the so-called background check, which is supposed to provide information about the candidate’s professional background. The trend originates from the Anglo-American financial world and is practiced in Germany, for example, by Targobank (ex-Citibank) or the private equity house Terra Firma. And it works like this: The company has the manager, who at this point is already on the shortlist of presented applicants, sign a “letter of consent” in which he or she agrees to the transfer of his or her application documents to researchers. Field of application: foreign reconnaissance External service providers take care of the research. Ernst & Young, for example. The consulting firm has appropriately named the check “Executive Integrity Assessment. Inquiries end up with Stefan Heißner, head of the white-collar crime department. Heißner sends in his colleague Christian Muth, a psychologist and ex-Bundeswehr officer who works in foreign reconnaissance. Muth and his team don’t stop with trivialities like Facebook queries. They rummage through search engines, press archives, compliance databases (more than 300 are accessible worldwide). If the manager has worked or studied abroad, foreign credentials are also validated. The process continues with the website www.indat.info, which also archives private insolvencies, and a look at the commercial register with the aim of identifying secret company holdings of the applicant. In addition to searching for documents or Internet entries, the specialists, who also include the detective agencies Corporate Trust in Munich and Janus Consulting near Frankfurt, rely on research in the managers’ environment – always looking for details that are not revealed in the official application. It is also common practice among headhunters to collect such references. But the detectives take a sharper approach.

Find out everything “in three to four weeks

In “three to four weeks,” for example, Frankfurt-based private investigator Klaus-Dieter Matschke says he can “find out everything about a person. Matschke – stocky, deep brown, his white hair swept back into the nape of his neck – is a kind of midwife to the scene; Janus Consulting founder Bernd Bühler learned from him. Matschke gained dubious notoriety years ago because he was allegedly involved in illegal investigations at Deutsche Bahn – something he has always denied. The passionate judo fighter, whose team includes police officers and prosecutors as well as a former Stasi man, investigates in old-school style. If necessary, he signs up at the manager’s tennis club or stalks him on the golf course, he explains frankly. In his investigations, he says, people’s vanity often helps: “If you flatter someone, they’ll tell you anything.” The questioning damages the candidate Whoever brazenly obtains trust under an intelligent legend does not even make himself liable to prosecution. The fact that the called or approached person squeals personal data may not matter to the investigator. For the managers under surveillance, however, the snooping often has dramatic consequences, says an unnerved headhunter who has observed the notorious background checks several times with his own protégés. It almost doesn’t matter whether the procedure yields results – the questions themselves damage the manager’s image in any case. It can then only become even more unpleasant in the job interview. Employers are increasingly making special requests at this stage of the application process, too: they ask for documents to prove that the manager has a spotless record – such as a police clearance certificate or a credit report. For a long time, such requests were considered a specialty of notoriously distrustful retail companies when dealing with their cashiers. But under the banner of all-encompassing compliance precautions, some employers now also place managers under blanket suspicion of cover-ups. Those who, like many Siemens managers, have lost their jobs in true purges and may still have to pay a hefty fine, could have reason to cover up misconduct and debts at the next job interview, the logic goes. With the blessing of legal counsel The companies have their legal advisors sign off on their actions. Freshfields partner Boris Dzida, for example, sees no problem in the question about the Schufa certificate. It is permissible to ask a potential CFO in the job interview about previous convictions for bribery, embezzlement, credit fraud or forgery of documents. Then, he said, the supervisory board might as well ask for “reliable documents” that allow it to “determine whether the applicant has answered admissible questions truthfully.” The problem: The documents show more. The certificate of good conduct also lists offenses that have nothing to do with the world of work. The Schufa credit report provides information about a person’s major credit transactions. So, in an extreme case, would a manager have to disclose to his new employer that he was fined years ago for hit-and-run parking and how his home loan is doing? That can be prevented, says Dzida. The company can make sure that the police report and financial certificate “are only accessible to a small group of people in the company who blacken irrelevant entries. Permissible or not? At present, this question is merely an academic dispute among lawyers. German courts have not yet had to rule on these questions, because no manager has filed a lawsuit so far. And presumably no one will either. Those who want the job at all costs will keep quiet. An interview with Stuttgart-based labor lawyer Stefan Nägele can be found at: www.manager-magazin.de/bewerberchecks The new applicant test at Rewe, it is said, is Caparros’ pride and joy. Because it wasn’t all that long ago that some Rewe personnel were muddling along with alchemist methods. The infamous “Reiss Profile” was in circulation at the company. The test is based on the theories of US psychologist Steven Reiss. He divides people’s actions into 16 basic motives, drives such as idealism, honor, status and independence, but also physical activity, rest and “eros.” Reiss’ theories are not scientifically valid, but they are just a pretty theory that everyone can relate to in some way. That makes the test popular with personnel managers. For a long time, the Reiss Profile was apparently circulating in the Rewe Group. After filling out the questionnaires, employees and those who wanted to become employees were then asked to explain their dominant motives in life – even questions about libido were discussed, according to reports.

Companies make use of bizarre procedures

Schütze-Kreilkamp explicitly distances herself from “unscientific diagnostics” and the Reiss tests, which “encroach on employees’ privacy.” At Rewe, the spook may be over – elsewhere, the most outlandish procedures continue to circulate. There is the controversial facial physiognomist (vulgo: skull interpreter) Dirk Schneemann, a trained painter who believes he can read a person’s characteristics from the shape of his head and maintains an office on Düsseldorf’s Königsallee. He is a welcome guest even in the circles of renowned personnel consultants and is regarded as a whimsical genius. The wondrous doctrine of graphology also seems to be endemic, especially among medium-sized companies. Interpreters of the written word claim to be able to read a person’s entire personality from handwriting. Experts like Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences professor and business psychologist Uwe Peter Kanning say this is utter humbug: “Graphology is a fanciful pseudoscience.” Yet somehow it sounds understandable that managerial handwriting must be “stable, regular and strong in print.” For example, Eugen Block, founder of the Block House steak restaurant chain, relies on the help of graphology to select managers. Anyone who is asked to have their facial shape measured or a handwriting sample analyzed before being hired will quickly know whether they should work for this company or simply turn down the job in case of doubt. However, both are just two particularly striking examples from the wealth of bizarre methods employers use to look behind the facade of applicants. At the top of the HR managers’ hit list are so-called type tests such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which is based on the teachings of psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung. The test classifies people in a lumbering fashion: test subjects are more likely to be “thinkers” or “feelers,” “inward-looking” or “extroverts,” “observers” or “judgers.” To the layperson, such ratings may seem seductive. But using the MBTI as the sole means of personnel selection is dangerous, complains renowned Hamburg aptitude diagnostician Werner Sarges: “The results are too easy to falsify.” Do candidates still have to put up with testing? The draft law on employee data protection, which has been going through parliamentary committees for some time, attempts to answer these questions. The reform actually aims to make it more difficult to screen employees who are already on board. Massive searches of account data (Deutsche Bahn), creditworthiness screenings via Creditreform (Kik) or the blanket spying on telephone contacts (Deutsche Telekom) should no longer be possible.

The more sensitive the position, the greater the effort required

The bill spends less effort on aptitude tests in the application process. It states succinctly that they should be “necessary” and carried out “according to scientifically recognized methods” “if such methods exist. Data protectionists are decidedly too lax. They want to oblige companies “to test exclusively on the basis of a scientific method,” explains Moritz Karg, data protection officer for Schleswig-Holstein. According to the will of the data protection experts, it should also no longer be possible to put candidates through the test mincer in series. Karg: “Data should only be allowed to be collected if they are indispensable for the performance of the job and represent crucial professional requirements.” Currently, serial tests are quite popular. For example, the “Integrity Assessment” from the company of the well-known Stuttgart-based aptitude diagnostician Heinz Schuler. Today, employers are specifically looking for rule-compliant employees, explains Schuler’s business partner Andreas Frintrup, who developed and markets the integrity test with his team. Psychological diagnostics help in the search, he says, because integrity is a “very stable personality trait that can be measured independently of intelligence.” If unintegre applicants were screened out from the outset, companies could change from a “culture of mistrust” to a “culture of trust”. So do away with complicated codes of ethics and expensive monitoring systems? Just let the honest ones on board, and with a little testing? That must be music to the ears of compliance officers. Around 100,000 times a year, Frintrup says, the integrity test is purchased: “Financial service providers and industrial companies are particularly interested.” Under the impression of annually increasing cases of uncovered white-collar crime, in view of rigid internal codes of conduct, and simply out of fear of “reputational damage,” companies are trying by all means “to minimize the dangers of unethical behavior in advance of hiring,” comments labor lawyer Boris Dzida. The more sensitive the position, the greater the effort. When it comes to executive board positions, such as the chief financial officer or the top IT officer, the supreme discipline of manager screening is increasingly used: the so-called background check, which is supposed to provide information about the candidate’s professional background.

The background check – personality scan by external service providers

The trend originates from the Anglo-American financial world and is practiced in Germany, for example, by Targobank (ex-Citibank) or the private equity house Terra Firma. And it works like this: The company has the manager, who at this point is already on the shortlist of presented applicants, sign a “letter of consent” in which he or she agrees to the transfer of his or her application documents to researchers. The searches are carried out by external service providers. Ernst & Young, for example. The consulting firm has appropriately named the check “Executive Integrity Assessment. Inquiries end up with Stefan Heißner, head of the white-collar crime department. Heißner sends in his colleague Christian Muth, a psychologist and ex-Bundeswehr officer who works in foreign reconnaissance. Muth and his team don’t stop with trivialities like Facebook queries. They rummage through search engines, press archives, compliance databases (more than 300 are accessible worldwide). If the manager has worked or studied abroad, foreign credentials are also validated. The process continues with the website www.indat.info, which also archives private insolvencies, and a look at the commercial register with the aim of identifying secret company holdings of the applicant. In addition to searching for documents or Internet entries, the specialists, who also include the detective agencies Corporate Trust in Munich and Janus Consulting near Frankfurt, rely on research in the managers’ environment – always looking for details that are not revealed in the official application. It is also common practice among headhunters to collect such references. But the detectives take a sharper approach. In “three to four weeks,” for example, Frankfurt-based private investigator Klaus-Dieter Matschke says he can “find out everything about a person. Matschke – a stocky, deep-brown man with white hair swept back at the nape of his neck – is a kind of midwife to the scene; Janus Consulting founder Bernd Bühler learned from him. Matschke gained dubious notoriety years ago because he was allegedly involved in illegal investigations at Deutsche Bahn – something he has always denied. The passionate judo fighter, whose team includes police officers and prosecutors as well as a former Stasi man, does his research in old-school style. He candidly explains that, if necessary, he signs up at the manager’s tennis club or stalks him on the golf course. In his investigations, he says, people’s vanity often helps: “If you flatter someone, they’ll tell you anything.” Those who brazenly gain trust under an intelligent legend do not even make themselves liable to prosecution. The fact that the person called or approached squeals about personal data may not matter to the investigator. For the managers under surveillance, however, the snooping often has dramatic consequences, says an unnerved headhunter who has observed the notorious background checks several times with his own protégés. It almost doesn’t matter whether the procedure yields results – the questions themselves damage the manager’s image in any case.

Those who want the job at all costs will keep quiet

It can then only become even more unpleasant in the job interview. In this phase of the application process, too, employers are increasingly making special requests: They demand documents that prove that the manager has a spotless record – such as a police clearance certificate or a credit report. For a long time, such requests were considered a specialty of notoriously distrustful retail companies when dealing with their cashiers. But under the banner of all-encompassing compliance precautions, some employers now also place managers under blanket suspicion of cover-ups. Those who, like many Siemens managers, have lost their jobs in true purges and may still have to pay a hefty fine, could have reason to cover up misconduct and debts at the next job interview, the logic goes. The companies have their actions approved by legal advisors. Freshfields partner Boris Dzida, for example, sees no problem in the question of the Schufa certificate. It is permissible to ask a potential CFO in the job interview about previous convictions for bribery, embezzlement, credit fraud or forgery of documents. Then, he said, the board might as well ask for “reliable documents” that allow it to “determine whether the applicant has answered admissible questions truthfully.” The problem: The documents show more. The certificate of good conduct also lists offenses that have nothing to do with the world of work. Schufa’s own credit report provides information about a person’s significant credit transactions. So, in an extreme case, would a manager have to disclose to his new employer that he was fined years ago for hit-and-run parking and what his home loan situation is? That can be prevented, says Dzida. The company could, after all, ensure that the police certificate and financial certificate are “only accessible to a small group of people in the company who blacken irrelevant entries.” Permissible or not? At present, this question is merely an academic dispute among lawyers. German courts have not had to rule on these questions so far, because no manager has filed a lawsuit. And presumably no one will either. Those who want the job at all costs will keep quiet. An interview with Stuttgart-based labor lawyer Stefan Nägele can be found at: www.manager-magazin.de/bewerberchecks Background Checks. What is allowed? What is forbidden? Experienced recruiters are of the opinion that people tend to cheat and keep quiet when they think they have a chance of getting an interesting and well-paid job. For this reason, personnel managers use background checks, applicant screening and pre-employment checks to obtain additional information about applicants as part of a personnel selection process. However, the check is not as simple as it sounds at first. The rights of applicants to protect their person are very far-reaching. In order to clarify what is feasible, but what HR managers should refrain from doing, JobStairs asked Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Jäger – university professor and former JobStairs spokesperson. “Clearly, a personnel manager has an interest in finding answers to questions that do not arise from the application documents. After all, it is their responsibility to fill the position as accurately as possible based on the requirements profile. However, the personal rights of the applicants and data protection limit the research. The legal basis for a background check is Section 32 (1) sentence 1 of the German Federal Data Protection Act (BDSG), which came into force on September 1, 2009. According to this, personal data of an employee, and according to Section 3 of the BDSG this also includes applicants, may be collected, processed or used for the purposes of the employment relationship if this is necessary for the decision on the establishment of an employment relationship.” So what personal data of an applicant may HR managers lawfully collect? It is important to know that employee data may only be collected directly from applicants who, for one, have provided it in the resume or voluntarily express it in an interview. If a company wishes to collect generally accessible data indirectly, this must be communicated to the applicant. However, it must also be taken into account that the interest of the employer must justifiably outweigh the interest of the applicant worthy of protection, especially his/her personal rights. The collection of personal data from other third parties even requires explicit consent. The extent and type of data collection must therefore always be proportionate to the purpose. The improper collection of personal data can result in legal consequences such as fines and even claims for damages as a violation of data protection law. The law even gives applicants carte blanche to lie. If inadmissible questions are asked in an interview, the applicant is allowed to provide incorrect information without the threat of legal consequences. The room for maneuver in the collection of personal data is thus narrow. “Everything that is already inadmissible in the normal application process applies all the more so to a background check,” says Professor Dr. Jäger, pointing out the legal risks for companies with which this form of research is fraught. This danger also applies to browsing social media, such as Facebook or Instagram. After all, this digital space more or less serves the voluntary presentation of private life and communication on a private level. An exploratory intrusion into this private sphere requires a notice to the applicant in any case because of an encroachment on personal rights. Platforms such as Xing and Linkedin, which are used specifically for the presentation of professional qualifications, are an exception to this. But here, too, the boundaries become blurred. After all, TikTok, Facebook or Instagram are now also used quite naturally as recriotiung channels. And from both sides. Only if there is a well-founded, i.e. provable, suspicion that an applicant has lied may information be obtained without knowledge. But who hires someone they don’t trust about their life’s journey?

Employer references: Not always easy to get

References and assessments from applicants’ former supervisors contribute useful and necessary information to the employee search process. But getting open and honest assessments from an ex-employer is becoming increasingly difficult. Such information can, under certain circumstances, lead to legal consequences for one side or the other. That is why specific information about former employees and their performance is not easy to obtain. Companies have been sued for providing insufficient information about former employees. Others have paid large settlement sums for providing negative references. It did not matter whether they were accurate or not.

References and testimonials: This is why they are so important

The legal uncertainties mean that companies sometimes check references and job references only superficially or do not request them at all. This is especially true when a quick decision is required and there is a risk of losing a candidate to the competition. Nevertheless, obtaining reliable information from former superiors is an important step that should should not be omitted. Otherwise, you may miss out on crucial information. To ensure that you are protected from legal pitfalls and actually receive reliable information about the candidate, the following are the most important tips for obtaining references from previous employers.

Tip 1: Legal protection – not without the applicant’s consent

Rule number one when obtaining references: Safeguard the candidate’s rights! The legal right to informational self-determination also applies to job applicants. Especially in the case of an extensive background check, you should keep in mind that the candidate alone has sovereignty over his or her personal data. A good solution is to inform the candidate right at the beginning of the interview. the beginning of the interview that you reserve the rightthat you reserve the right to check his or her credentials and references. This can look like this, for example: “In case of mutual interest, we would contact your reference providers. Do you agree to this?” This will not only give you the needed consent from the candidate, but may have the side effect of providing more honest answers. If the candidate declines or squirms, it may be an indication of fake references or other forms of application fraud. Asking for references is legitimate as long as the information has something to do with the career and does not violate the General Equal Treatment Act (AGG).

Tip 2: Don’t delegate – talk to the reference provider yourself

Although obtaining references from the previous employer is a time-consuming matter, it is better not to delegate this task. If you are the potential employee’s direct supervisor in the future, be sure to check their references yourself. No matter how thorough your employees or your deputy may be, you will be asking questions that others won’t think of. Another benefit is that you’ll be talking to an ex-employer on a level playing field, which may give you more detailed and honest answers. Also, reviewing job references is a good way to learn how best to deal with the employee in question. It makes sense to ask for references verbally rather than in writing. The ideal situation, of course, is to talk to the reference in person, where you can also observe his or her reactions. In everyday business, however, this is rarely possible due to time constraints. Therefore, it is better to check references on the phone instead of obtaining the desired information by e-mail. When you call, you get at least part of the reactions, for example hesitation, of your interlocutor directly. In addition, this could develop into a conversation from which you can gain further information.

Tip 3: The right question strategy – encourage open answers

Prepare already during the interview prepare to ask for references. Ask the candidate questions whose answers you can refer to later during the call with the reference provider. For example, ask him what his previous employers would say about the way he works. You can use this answer perfectly to start a frank conversation with the former supervisor: “Mr. XY told me that you consider him to be an extremely resilient and loyal employee.” After this conversation opener, let the former employer talk. You may not get a completely honest answer, but you can expect to hear meaningful comments and insights.

Tip 4: Good questions – these are the topics you should address.

Conduct the call in a matter-of-fact tone and don’t jump the gun. Your interviewer will be more open with you if the conversation takes place in a relaxed atmosphere. It is often a good idea to arrange an to arrange an appointment for the reference interview in advanceso that your interviewer can prepare for it. It is best to start with a few basic questions about the duration of the employment, the applicant’s tasks and his or her skills. This may allow you to directly identify a possible falsified reference. Questions for the reference check by topic 1. general

  • From when to when did employee XY work for your company?
  • Did contact continue after his departure?
  • Do you still remember the background for his resignation?
  • Can you report on any special features of Mr./Mrs. XY?
  • Would you hire him/her again?
  • What are his/her weaknesses? What are his/her strengths?
  • Where did he/she surprise you?
  • What about absenteeism?

2. mode of operation

  • How does he/she handle deadline pressure?
  • Does he/she cope with guidelines or need freedom to work well?
  • How did he/she compare to colleagues in similar positions?
  • What goals was he/she measured against?
  • What project did he/she do well?

3. leadership skills

  • How many employees did he/she manage?
  • Does he/she put himself/herself in front of his/her team or does he/she prefer to stay in the background?
  • How does he/she lead meetings: openly or more to the point?
  • Could you imagine working under Mr./Mrs. XY?

4. social skills

  • How does Mr./Mrs. XY deal with criticism?
  • According to which criteria does he/she make decisions?
  • What distinguished his/her behavior towards colleagues, superiors and business partners?
  • How would you describe his/her behavior in conflict situations?

When asking for references, keep in mind that as a potential employer, you may only ask questions that are are relevant to the hiring of the person in questiond. Anything beyond that violates the applicant’s personal rights. Also, be aware that the reference provider cannot disclose information without restriction if he or she does not want to be on legal ice. Checking references can be a time-consuming process. Compared to the consequences of an wrong personnel decision the effort is manageable. In the end, if you’ve found the perfect candidate for a job, the effort will have been worth it. Best Hotels In Pench.




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